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Displaying 75–90 (of 2455)

Title Date
Roll On, Digital Reorganization. Telefonica Posts First Loss In Nine Years

11-11-2011
SAP Partners With EMC, VMware on Cloud Platform

Summary
The company is deepening its partnerships with EMC and VMware to improve business agility and scale efficiencies. - As cloud computing and virtualization rapidly evolve, business management software specialist SAP (NYSE: SAP) is working in a three-way strategic collaboration with partners EMC (NYSE: EMC) and VMware to develop tools and services that make it possible for businesses to adopt cloud and run SAP s...
11-11-2011
Mobile Operators Missing Opportunity to Double Cash Returns for Investors

11-10-2011
Turning Customer Intelligence Into Gold

11-10-2011
How to declare 'one version of the truth'

Summary
Trying to establish "one version of the truth" when it comes to operational data can be like searching for the Holy Grail at a lot of companies. With a redoubled focus on managing via metrics these days, it is more important than ever to have one version to work with, writes Chris Murphy at InformationWeek. A CIO should just "declare" one version of the truth, suggests Jeanne Ross, director of MIT Sloan School's Center for Information Systems Research. Simply choose a source and then announce that it will be the version everyone will use. "Once you tell everyone 'This is our single source,' they work pretty hard to make it more accurate," Ross said at the TechTomorrow conference last month.  It may sound a bit impulsive, Murphy writes, but this approach can significantly cut the amount of time IT groups spend gathering and filtering information to deliver what they believe is the right data--even when there are constituencies who would just as soon leave some ambiguity in the numbers. This approach is somewhat reflective of a project at Procter & Gamble, where CIO Filippo Passerini and his group built a meeting room for executives to analyze business metrics. They did not wait for a perfect set of data to initiate the project, however. "We intentionally put the cart before the horse, because it is a way to force change," Passerini said. Trying to establish perfect data to serve as the "one source" does not necessarily match with any business goal. "It reeks of data for data's sake," Murphy warns. "But if people can see how a single source of the truth relates to gaining market share, or not ticking off customers, then they know why it's important. That's a truth they'll find worth seeking." For more:- see Chris Murphy's post at InformationWeek Related Articles:How to prepare for the 'big data' eraThe emerging world of non-traditional and synthetic dataAdvice: Stop worrying about data quality
11-09-2011
Hadoop gains traction in the enterprise

Summary
Enterprises have begun embracing open source storage and analysis system Hadoop even though technology issues and a host of questions related to data security and management remain. By enabling businesses to manage vast amounts of structured and unstructured data more affordably than relational database systems can, Hadoop is gaining traction beyond Web 2.0 companies like Google (NASDAQ: GOOG), Yahoo and eBay, reports Jaikumar Vijayan at ComputerWorld. JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) has been using Hadoop for nearly three years in a growing number of functions, including fraud detection, IT risk management and self service, the company's managing director Larry Feinsmith said this week at the Hadoop World conference in New York. With Hadoop, Chase has been able to gather and store huge amounts of unstructured data from social media, blogs and transactions. Bringing all of the disparate data into one platform, the company can apply data mining and analytics tools on the information. The question right now for IT pros at Chase is whether Hadoop-based technology can one day be used for processing transactions as well.  There are a number of challenges enterprises should consider when implementing Hadoop, however, Feinsmith cautions. Products, standards and vendors seem to be in flux, making for a "very confusing marketplace," he said. There are also integration challenges and relatively few engineers with Hadoop expertise. What's more, the ability to aggregate such massive quantities of data, in itself, leads to a number of concerns around security, access, availability and business continuity. In a separate article, Vijayan takes a look at the security issues that are raised in deploying Hadoop. Data access concerns have led some federal agencies to keep sensitive data out of Hadoop databases. Other users have turned to encryption to protect data stored in a Hadoop environment. The jumble of disparate data that Hadoop can aggregate can mean mixing together information of varying security sensitivity, cautions Richard Clayton, a software engineer with Berico Technologies. Enterprises have to put the right controls in place to ensure role-based access.   Having so much data in one place also raises the risk of inadvertent disclosure and theft.  If analytical tools create new datasets with sensitive information, those sets have to be protected as well. One way that government agencies are protecting Hadoop-stored information is by walling it off in "enclaves" that only cleared personnel can access. Despite the technology's challenges, enterprises are vying for IT pros with Hadoop skills, reports Doug Henschen at InformationWeek. JPMorgan Chase, eBay and Cloudera were all in recruiting mode at the Hadoop World conference. Henschen notes that Hadoop World has tripled in size since the 2009 conference, and the technology has been embraced by IBM (NYSE: IBM), Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT)and Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL) this year.  For more:- see Jaikumar Vijayan's article at ComputerWorld- see Jaikumar Vijayan's article on Hadoop security issues at ComputerWorld- see Doug Henschen's article at InformationWeek Related Articles:How Microsoft learned to accept open sourceConsider open source when deploying BI
11-09-2011
Empathy, Self-Interest, and Economics

Summary
Companies that want to earn their customers trust have to be willing to act in their customers interestsometimes even when the customers interest conflicts with their own (at least in the short term).
11-09-2011
Why you should get into the gaming game

Summary
Gaming--or gamification--is infiltrating the enterprise as a means of improving business skills training and engaging customers on websites. In the meantime, enterprises are infiltrating popular online games, such as Farmville and Mafia Wars on Facebook, to reach out to potential customers, writes Michael Hugos, principal at Center for Systems Innovation. Farmers Insurance has gotten into the Farmville game, offering players virtual services, such as crop watering by a virtual blimp branded with the company name. Shouldn't car makers and auto parts dealers participate on popular racing game sites, such as TrackMania, and offer their own teams, Hugos asks. "Why don't more physical fitness and nutrition companies have sports games like the Nike Running Game?," he writes in a post at CIO magazine. Businesses that join the online gaming mania will succeed if they manage to interest other players rather than just peddle their wares, Hugos suggests. CIOs could be instrumental in this effort by identifying personnel already well-versed in popular games. The marketing department might take an interest when they learn how inexpensively they can generate brand awareness. "[L]ots of companies already have skilled gamers who are masquerading as mild-mannered Clark Kents and Lois Lanes during working hours," he suggests. "Now tell the marketing folks that in the best interests of advancing the company's reputation you're going to put some IT staff on the project and let them play video games at work. You might be surprised at what happens." For more:- see Michael Hugos' post at CIO Related Articles:Hilton, Siemens, SAP play video gamesGamers leave radiology center's data exposedWould you outsource to FarmVille?
11-09-2011
3 Keys To Analytics Success

Summary
Businesses need to overcome cultural barriers, like resistance to change, to get most bang for their analytics buck, a new study shows.
11-09-2011
F.C.C. and Cable Companies Push to Close Digital Divide

Summary
The Federal Communications Commission is hoping to close the digital divide by developing cheap high-speed Internet access for low-income households.
11-09-2011
MTN Group to Spend $1 Billion on Fast 3G Wireless Stations

Summary
MTN Group Ltd. plans to spend about 8 billion rand ($1 billion) to increase the number of third- generation wireless stations for faster data transmission in South Africa, and may install quicker technology if the government approves a license next year.
11-09-2011
Mobile Payments Offer Financial Institutions Opportunities With the Unbanked

11-09-2011
tw telecom: It's Time to Raise Ethernet's IQ

Summary
Tw telecom exec says a fast (and dumb) Ethernet pipe won't cut it anymore as enterprise customers head to the cloud for all their apps needs
11-09-2011
Adobe kills Flash Player for mobile browsers

Summary
Adobe Systems will halt development of its browser-based Flash Player application runtime for mobile devices, shifting its focus to native apps and the HTML5 web standard. "Over the past two years, we've delivered Flash Player for mobile browsers and brought the full expressiveness of the web to many mobile devices," writes Adobe Interactive Development vice president and general manager Danny Winokur on the Adobe Featured Blog. "However, HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively. This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms." Moving forward, Adobe will focus on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with its Adobe AIR runtime for all the major app stores. "We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook," Winokur states. "We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations. We will also allow our source code licensees to continue working on and release their own implementations." Winokur adds Adobe is already at work on Flash Player 12. Adobe Systems released Flash Player 11 and AIR 3 just last month, promising publishers the tools to deliver console-quality 2D and 3D gaming experiences to mobile platforms including Google's (NASDAQ:GOOG) Android, Apple's (NASDAQ:AAPL) iOS (via the AIR runtime) and Research In Motion's (NASDAQ:RIMM) BlackBerry Tablet OS as well as the desktop and connected TVs. A superset of Flash Player, AIR enables developers to leverage existing code to build standalone applications across devices and platforms--AIR extensions add support for unique device features and native code libraries, giving developers the flexibility to mix and match elements of Flash, HTML5 and native code. Companies including Apple and Google have made significant investments in HTML5, long considered a significant threat to Flash's continued viability. In many respects, the Adobe Flash deathwatch officially began in April 2010, when Apple rewrote its iPhone developer agreement to mandate that all applications must be written to run directly on the iOS platform, effectively banning cross-compiler translation tools like Adobe's Flash Professional CS5. Even prior to the move, late Apple CEO Steve Jobs had long maintained the iOS platform would never support Flash content, privately dismissing Adobe as "lazy" and blaming Flash as the culprit behind most Mac crashes. Roughly six months after instituting the cross-compiler ban, Apple reversed course, easing restrictions on the creation of iOS-based applications. "We are relaxing all restrictions on the development tools used to create iOS apps, as long as the resulting apps do not download any code," Apple said in a statement. "This should give developers the flexibility they want, while preserving the security we need." The changes enable developers to design and build apps in Flash, then convert their efforts to Apple-approved code--the revisions do not mean consumers are able to access Flash-based web content via their iPhone, iPod touch and iPad devices, however. Weeks after Apple lifted the ban on cross-compiler translation tools, Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen said the overall impact of Apple's actions was "muted." Asked during Adobe's third-quarter 2010 earnings call whether Apple's decision to again allow tools like CS5 would impact demand for Adobe Creative products, Narayen said "What we did see was that the day Apple announced the removal of the licensing restrictions that a number of people who had created products using our tool submitted that to the Apple Store and were approved. I think it just continues to reflect the opportunity which we have with our tools, which is to help designers and developers continue to develop their applications and content in our tools and repurpose it to multiple different output media." Last month, Adobe Systems acquired Nitobi Software, creator of PhoneGap, an open-source development platform enabling programmers to build cross-platform apps written in HTML5 and JavaScript. PhoneGap technology has been used to create thousands of apps across iOS, Android, BlackBerry and other mobile platforms. For more:- read this Adobe Systems blog entry Related articles:Adobe purchases Nitobi for smartphone app developmentAdobe enables multi-platform 3D mobile gaming with Flash Player 11Adobe extends streaming video to Apple's iOSAdobe extends Flash Builder 4.5 to iOS and RIMAdobe touts HTML5 advances with Creative Suite 5.5 release
11-09-2011
Big Data?Big Challenges

Summary
You probably feel you have a good sense of the assets of your organization. You know how many employees you have because they are all in an HR database. You know the sales you made last month because they are all in a sales ledger database. You know how many items you have in stock because they are all in an ERP database. You know how many computers you have because they are all in an asset database. And at the end of the year, all these databases will be queried to produce the annual accounts.
11-09-2011

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